Southern MD Civil War Round Table 5th Annual Field Trip

Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table

South Mountain Battlefields Tour

Saturday, May 6, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.


The Tour:  Join us for the fifth annual Spring Tour of the Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table.  This tour will begin in La Plata (CSM Campus), where participants will board a chartered bus for the trip to the South Mountain battlefields (Fox’s Gap, Turner’s Gap, and Crampton’s Gap).

Fought on September 14, 1862 (prior to the Battle of Antietam), one Confederate division and part of a second, numbering perhaps 10,000 men held off as many as 40,000 Union troops desperately trying to force their way across the South Mountain gaps to relieve the siege of Harper’s Ferry.

Come join this bus and walking tour of the three battles that set the tone for the rest of the Maryland Campaign.  This tour will be of interest to the die-hard enthusiast and the novice alike.

The Guide:  Brad Gottfried, CSM President and author of eleven Civil War books, including the Maps of Antietam, which chronicles the epic “David and Goliath” Fight will lead the tour.  All participants will receive detailed maps to better explain the actions.

Cost: The cost of the trip (bus and lunch) is $55 for members and $65 for nonmembers.  Save money through early bird registration (March 8, 2017)– $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers.  For additional information, or to register, contact Brad Gottfried at 301- 934- 7625 or bradgottfried@yahoo.com.

Southern MD Civil War Round Table Film Series

March 14, 2017

Come out and join us for the second season of Civil War films from 4:25pm – 6:45pm, prior to the regularly scheduled Round table meeting tonight.  Movies will be shown at the College of Southern Maryland’s Center for Business and Industry, Chaney Enterprises Conference Center, Room BI-113, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.  Admission is free!

Tonight’s Feature:  “Free State of Jones“

Newton Knight, played by Matthew McConaughey, is a disillusioned Confederate army deserter who returns to Mississippi to lead a militia of fellow deserters, runaway slaves, and women in an uprising against the corrupt local Confederate government. “The movie tells of a counter-rebellion in a Mississippi town during the Civil War, and is based on a true story. The film is done in a style that emulates “Twelve Years a Slave”, and … deals with topics of slavery and secession in a way that is poignant but also constructive” (Casey Nicholson). The “free state” that Knight formed within the state of Mississippi operates under the credo that no man shall be owned, and poor men should not be losing their lives so the rich can get richer. It’s a truly powerful film about freedom and an earnest man who believes in equality–even on a subconscious level” (IMDb).

March 2017 Southern MD Civil War Round Table Meeting

March 14, 2017

The Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table is pleased to announce that its next meeting will take place on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 7:00pm at the College of Southern Maryland’s Center for Business and Industry, Chaney Enterprises Conference Center, Room BI-113, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.

Guest Speaker:  Bonnie Mangan

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Join us tonight as Ms. Bonnie Mangan educates us about Clara Barton’s Efforts to Identify Civil War Missing Soldiers!

Clara Barton is often identified as a Civil War nurse and the founder of the American Red Cross. But between the end of the Civil War and her introduction the Red Cross while traveling in Switzerland, she sought to find out what happened to the thousands of unknown Union dead.

Barton considered the naming of the dead an obligation of the nation that sent so many to an unaccounted death far from home. Just as she saw a need to have medical care and supplies at hand on the field during the battle, she recognized that “an accounting of the dead is an accounting to the bereaved,” as Drew Gilpin Faust explains in This Republic of Suffering. Barton understood both of these needs before the government did.

Barton began her work just prior to the Quartermaster Office’s Reburial Program.

In April 1866 Congress passed a Joint Resolution that authorized and required the Secretary of War “to take immediate measures to preserve from desecration the graves of soldiers of the United States who fell in battle or died of disease in hospitals; to secure suitable burial places in which they may be properly interred; and to have the graves enclosed so that the resting places of the honored dead may be kept sacred forever.” Barton sought to name the individual dead, something finally done with the National Cemetery Act of 1872.

Using Barton’s writings, this talk will concentrate on the work of the Missing Soldiers Office. During this period, Barton went on the lecture circuit speaking about her wartime experiences to fund the Missing Soldiers Office. Barton also testified before the Congressional Joint Committee on Reconstruction reporting on conditions in Georgia, which she viewed first hand when she accompanied the expedition to set up the Andersonville National Cemetery.

Though Barton’s work on behalf of the missing was undertaken independently of the government’s (as Clara often preferred) they were part of the overall national program to honor those who gave the last full measure. And Barton certainly should be considered a pioneer in this endeavor.

 

Clara Barton - from a public domain image

 

Bonnie Mangan grew up in Chicago and attended the University of Illinois.  She earned Masters degrees in Middle East Studies and Library Science. After working aboard she was hired by the Congressional Research Service at the Library of Congress. She recently retired after 36 years of faithful federal service.

Bonnie became interested in mid 19th century history reading about the Alcotts and the Transcendentalists. After hearing Eileen Conklin speak on Women at Gettysburg, 1863, she signed up to attend the first Conference on Women and the Civil War, the precursor to the Society for Women and the Civil War (SWCW). To learn about the Civil War she followed the Vermont Brigade. Bonnie credits her late friend, Dorie Silber of Walden, VT, and Wilbur Fisk  (2nd VT) with nurturing this interest.

Since 2011 Bonnie has been a National Park Service volunteer at Arlington House where she is considered the resident Yankee. She is a docent at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office. She also serves on the board of SWCW.

Bonnie lives in Arlington, VA with her cats Fuller (named for Margaret Fuller) and Alcott (named for all the Alcotts)

Southern MD Civil War Round Table Film Series

February 14, 2017

Come out and join us for the second season of Civil War films from 4:15pm – 6:45pm, prior to the regularly scheduled Round Table meeting tonight.  Movies will be shown at the College of Southern Maryland’s Center for Business and Industry, Chaney Enterprises Conference Center, Room BI-113, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.  Admission is free!

Tonight’s Feature:  “Cold Mountain“

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In the waning days of the American Civil War, a wounded soldier (played by Jude Law) embarks on a perilous journey back home to Cold Mountain, North Carolina to reunite with his sweetheart, played by Nicole Kidman. Renee Zellweger won an Academy Award for her role as Ruby Thewes.

February 2017 Southern MD Civil War Round Table Meeting

February 14, 2017

The Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table is pleased to announce that its next meeting will take place on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at 7:00pm at the College of Southern Maryland’s Center for Business and Industry, Chaney Enterprises Conference Center, Room BI-113, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.

Guest Speaker:  Civil War Trivia Night

GOTCHAA!!!  Tonight, we step away from our normal meeting format of guest speaker’s for a little something that should provide will prove to test your knowledge of Civil War generals, battles, politicians and other notable figures/events!

Have you ever watched Jeopardy and wished that every category was related to the Civil War?

Free for a limited time! New item.... Civil War Jeopardy! There are ...

Well, now’s your chance to make that wish a reality.

Our February meeting will be based on Civil War-related facts and trivia. You will be in teams of 4 -6 depending on the number of attendees. Teams will be randomly assigned after the announcements are made; so do your research and come ready to win.

The winning team will make history as the first winners of the Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table Facts and Trivia Contest.

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Attendance is free for all, but membership is recommended.  For information, contact the Round Table’s president, Brad Gottfried, at bgottfried@csmd.edu or 301-934-7625

Southern MD Civil War Round Table Film Series

January 10, 2017

Come out and join us for the second season of Civil War films from 5:00pm – 6:45pm, prior to the regularly scheduled Round Table meeting tonight.  Please note that tonight’s movie will be shown at the College of Southern Maryland’s Community Education Building, Room CE-101, 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.  Admission is free!

Tonight’s Feature:  “Wicked Spring”

 

During the 1864 battle of the Wilderness, three Union soldiers and three Confederate Soldiers get separated from their units as twilight engulfs the ravaged battlefield. They wander alone through the dangerous woods, separated from each other, until they meet by chance on the banks of a quiet creek. The men meet and spend the night around a campfire, not realizing they are enemies until the next morning when the sun rises and a new day of battle begins. – Kevin R. Hershberger

January 2017 Southern MD Civil War Round Table

January 10, 2017

The Southern Maryland Civil War Round Table is pleased to announce that its next meeting will take place on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 7:00pm at the College of Southern Maryland’s Center for Business and Industry, Chaney Enterprises Conference Center, Room BI-113, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata, MD.

Guest Speaker:  William Connery

Join William C. Connery as he recounts the notable events and battles that occurred in Northern Virginia in 1861 after the firing on Fort Sumter. In the mid-nineteenth century, Alexandria was a port across from the Nation’s Capital; Arlington was an 1100 acre estate managed by U.S. Colonel and Mrs. Robert E. Lee; Fairfax, Prince William and Loudoun Counties consisted of rolling farmland and tiny villages. This peaceful region was thrown into chaos as South Carolina seceded from the Union in Dec. 1860 and other slave states followed until Virginia finally joined the Confederacy in April and May 1861. The ‘invasion’ of Northern Virginia on May 24, 1861, created a no-man’s land between Yankee and Rebel armies, especially in the area south of Alexandria. Some citizens joined Confederate forces, while others stayed to face uncertainty. This book offers new insights into this most important time in American history.

William S. Connery grew up in Baltimore, Maryland, considered ‘neutral territory’ in the Civil War. As a young boy, his family visited the battlefields of Gettysburg, Antietam, and other local historical sites. He has a degree in history from the University of Maryland. Since 1989, Mr. Connery has lived in Fairfax County. He contributes to the Civil War Courier and other publications. He was awarded the prestigious Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal by the Fairfax Chapter of the UDC for this book. His other book, Mosby’s Raids in Civil War Northern Virginia, deals with the Gray Ghost of the Confederacy, who became a friend of U.S. Grant after the War! Mr. Connery is a frequently requested speaker on the Civil War and other American history topics in the Washington, D.C., metro region. He can be reached at william.connery@verizon.net.